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About Healthcare Science

Abstraction of a world
 
 

Healthcare science encompasses 50+ disciplines across five divisions and healthcare scientists are involved in 80% of all clinical decisions in the NHS, developing some of the most innovative clinical and technological advancements.

Although the healthcare science workforce only accounts for 5% of the healthcare workforce in the UK, they are involved through the entire care pathway from test to treatment and rehabilitation.

 

Healthcare Science Divisions and Disciplines

Laboratory Sciences

  • Analytical toxicology
  • Analogical pathology
  • Blood transfusion science / transplantation
  • Clinical biochemistry
  • Clinical Immunology
  • Cytopathology including cervical cytology
  • Electron microscopy
  • External quality assurance
  • Genomic including genomic counselling
  • Haematology
  • Haemostasis and thrombosis
  • Histocompatibility and immunogenetics
  • Histopathology
  • Microbiology inc. infection control & epidemiology, decontamination science virology, bacteriology, mycology and parasitology
  • Paediatric metabolic biochemistry
  • Tissue banking

Bioinformatics

  • Clinical bioinformatics and genomics
  • Computer science and modelling
  • Health Informatics

Imaging Sciences

  • Radiographer - diagnostic
  • Radiographer - therapeutic

Physiological Sciences

  • Audiology
  • Autonomic neurovascular function
  • Cardiac physiology
  • Clinical perfusion
  • Critical care technology
  • Gastrointestinal physiology
  • Neurophysiology
  • Ophthalmic and vision science
  • Respiratory physiology
  • Sleep physiology
  • Urodynamics and urological measurements
  • Vascular technology
  • Vision science

Physical Sciences and Biomedical Engineering

  • Biomechanical engineering
  • Clinical measurement
  • Diagnostic radiology
  • Equipment management and clinical engineering
  • Magnetic resonance imaging
  • Maxillofacial prosthetics and reconstruction
  • Medical electronics and instrumentation
  • Medical engineering design
  • Medical illustration and clinical photography
  • Non ionising radiation
  • Nuclear medicine
  • Radiation protection and monitoring
  • Radiopharmacy
  • Radiotherapy physics
  • Rehabilitation engineering
  • Renal dialysis technology
  • Ultrasound

Laboratory Sciences

Laboratory scientists test samples collected from patients to ensure they get the best possible care. Whether that’s urgent blood cross-matching, testing for dangerous viruses (such as COVID-19) or diagnosing cancer – healthcare scientists are an integral part of the healthcare team.

Physiological Sciences

Healthcare scientists who work in physiological sciences use specialist equipment, advanced technologies and a range of different procedures to evaluate the functioning of different body systems such as the heart and lungs, hearing, vision or nervous system, and diagnose abnormalities. The work involves direct interaction with patients in a range of areas.

Physical Sciences and Biomedical Engineering

From developing methods of measuring what is happening in the body, devising new ways of diagnosing and treating disease, to developing techniques to design artificial limbs and body parts, or improve facial reconstruction for those involved in accidents or born with disabilities. Clinical engineering and medical physics ensure the myriad of clinical equipment, medical gases and everything in-between is purchased, calibrated, maintained and is functioning safely and effectively.

Bioinformatics

An interdisciplinary field that develops methods and software tools for understanding large and complex biological data sets. Combines biology, computer science, information engineering, mathematics and statistics to analyse and interpret data. Areas of computer science are used including software tools that generate useful biological knowledge by manipulating ‘big data’.

Imaging Sciences

These roles focus on the generation, collection and analysis of images including things that the eye cannot detect. Diagnostic radiographers generally use x-rays, alongside other imaging modalities, to see inside a patient's body and help diagnose what is wrong with them. Therapeutic radiographers use a range of technical equipment to deliver accurate doses of radiation to tumours to destroy diseased tissue, while minimising the amount of radiation to surrounding healthy tissue.